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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Nov 21, 2012 8:00am PST
just arrived in egypt where she will hold talks with egyptian president morsi about a possible truce in gaza. clinton already has met with palestinian president abbas and ramallah and israeli print minister benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem. we go to gaza city where we're joined by "democracy now!" course on sharif abdel kouddous. this latest article was just published by "the nation." explain how you got into gaza and what is happening there now. >> i got in through the rafah border crossing, the only border that bosra has to the outside world not controlled by israel. i had to wait three days on the border to get in from egypt, but i eventually did. it is really a dystopian reality, one of raleigh -- widespread violence and suffering. there is heavy naval bombing with the buzz of the drones overhead that really gives you the feeling of being under constant threat. you can hear the outgoing rockets being fired into israel. the streets are quite empty, shops are closed, there's a heavy tension in the air. last night, talks of a cease- fire were under way. it was particularly brutal. th
WHUT
Nov 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
tragedy. the entire world should be responsible regarding this aggression. egypt. egypt, the revolution, will not spare any effort to stop this aggression. and achieve a sustainable truce. >> meanwhile in washington, we're joined by two guests, the award winning palestinian journalist mohammed omer, and we want to teach you for being with us, back again, thank you so much. tell us what is happening on the ground in gaza right now. >> you are welcome. let me start with -- i'm in the southern part of the gaza strip s just launched two missiles, killing one person and a person has just arrived to the hospital. he was 24 years old. that brings the number of air strikes last three days to 502. this resulted in the killing of a 23 -- killing of 23 people, most of whom more civilians. we need to talk about the humanitarian situation in the gaza strip. this is a situation targeting a population of civilians, israel is shooting in a fishbowl. there is no shelter and nowhere to run for the general population. because that is living in a very dire situation. the u.n. has decided to shut
LINKTV
Nov 9, 2012 3:00pm PST
, france, asia minor, north africa and egypt. transportation expert ross hassig. it was closer is terms of the cost of transportation to get to egypt than it was to get a hundred miles inland in italy. you couldn't bring food from a hundred miles inland to rome, because even with carts, even with oxen, it simply cost too much. so rome was able to tap into the production of other areas because it was able to use ships where the cost of transportation was extremely low. keach: but roman seagoing merchant ships carrying upwards of a thousand tons were too large to navigate the tiber river, so cargos were unloaded onto smaller vessels downriver at the port city of ostia. ostia was once a bustling commercial city, with shops and restaurants... villas and apartment houses for merchants and shippers... theaters, parks and enormous warehouses crammed with every possible commodity. archaeologist amanda claridge. it's clear that the merchants, the many, many thousands of people involved in the supply of the city of rome who did base themselves in ostia -- all the transient ships' captains and the
WHUT
Nov 14, 2012 6:00pm EST
hard was it to get in from egypt? >> a lot of bureaucratic hassles the border is still apparently controlled by the old security services who were under mubarak, close to assad, the caa. it is hard to know how much is bureaucrats try to make life difficult dullish trying to make life difficult, and how much is planned harassment. for the gazans, it is no joke. if you want to go somethinthrouh something like past for control, is like three hours. >> while you're there, another freedom flotilla ship tried to get in from scandinavia. what was the response on land? >> it was a lot of excitement. people are very happy to know that someone knows they are there, and that people are willing to risk something. it is not a joke. they're trying to break through. we had a press conference at the port. to my amazement, it was uncovered in the most reactionary newspaper in israel. but for the people there, it is just a sign that they have not been forgotten, maybe they will get out. >> we're speaking to the first time after president obama was reelected read your thoughts? >> their two good thi
LINKTV
Nov 6, 2012 9:00am PST
i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the united states and iraq. and i had just heard on cnn,
LINKTV
Nov 7, 2012 4:00pm PST
egypt. fourier was apparently so impressed by the well-preserved sarcophagi that he kept his rooms uncomfortably hot for visitors while also wearing a heavy coat himself. the heated problem that fourier took on in his famous memoir, on the propagation of heat in solid objects, was the problem of heating and cooling of our earth, our own cycle of temperatures. the french mathematician developed his understanding of heat flow in terms of newton's law of cooling that says that the movement of heat between two bodies is proportional to their temperature difference. translating this to the infinitesimal scale of temperature differences between infinitely close positions in an object gives the famous differential equation called the "heat equation." in fourier's solution of the heat equation, he found these periodic solutions of sinusoids mirroring the cycle of teeratures over the year as the accumulation of periodic effects, such as the regular orbit around the sun and the daily spinning of the earth on its axis. fourier found that no matter how complicated a wave is, it's the sum of ma
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)